Meet the artisans below! Find out which artisan made your craft on the tag included with each product.

Alphonsine, mother of 11 children, 8 of whom are adopted.

When I’m weaving, I think about making my bowl perfect, finishing it on time, and how it will help me to achieve my goals.  …I always weave my bowl thinking of my life and my family.

Alphonsine, mother of 11 children, 8 of whom are adopted.Zamuka Cooperative
Zamuka Cooperative

Progress Upwards Cooperative

Since Zamuka’s formation in 2007, the group has grown in leaps and bounds. The women of Zamuka work in the Rugendabari community in Muhanga District, weaving bowls. They are among the best weavers in the region, and have made the significant step of taking on weaving as their profession rather than a side job. The women meet together regularly, working and exchanging advice on everything from weave quality, to child rearing, to good health practices. Their income from weaving means that they can employ their neighbors, support the local suppliers of raw materials, give business to the community market vendors, and invest in the health of their land and their families. Their children have increased access to nutrition, health, and education. Their husbands have increased their respect and appreciation of their wives.

Several members of the Zamuka Cooperative have been engaged as expert trainers for other artisans who would like to add basket weaving to their crafts skills.

Currently Creating…